Road Blocks

I was praying this morning, God,
for all the people in Mozambique
and Malawi and Zimbabwe,
in the midst of the terrible losses
from cyclone Idai —
the deaths and injury and destruction,
the ongoing need for rescue

and I learned that the roads are broken.

I should have known —
the roads between towns
are impassable,
the bridges smashed, ports unusable.
Also those other paths —
electricity, telephone, Internet,
are gone as well.

And I went from that
flat-hand-on-the-newspaper prayer,
to the jail and my meeting
for spiritual care,
and walked among others
with no access to common roads,

and realized that journey
is not a parable for Lent
for these,
your children on the inside.

And so holy Valley-uplifter,
Rough-place-leveler,
I call you to attend
to all who suffer broken roads —

broken highways or heartways,
or sometimes minds that cannot
find a way out of whatever
dead end they are in,

and teach me to pay attention, too,
put my back against
every road block,
become an opener of the way home.

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7 Responses to Road Blocks

  1. celestem579 says:

    Beautiful, Maren, and very helpful! Thank you. I pray with you.

  2. Maren says:

    Thank you, Celeste and lovely to hear from you.

  3. Pingback: Rough, Broken Roads | God of the Sparrow 🌱 By Kathy Manis Findley

  4. Maren, This is so moving and real. It illicited some major reflection on my part. It also moved me to blog about it and to include your words, with proper credit and a link to your site. If you want to see it on my blog visit kalliopekathryne.com.

    Thank you for always finding words that pull up emotions.

    Blessings,

    Kathy

  5. in the words of my African ancestors- Ashe’ Help us to pay attention to things right under our nose. God help them…

  6. Thank you Maren. I first learned about their plight on BBC News. We must park and pray at 1:11 or whenever for those who are in the midst of this deadly crisis.

  7. Maren says:

    Amen! It is so sad that so much of the rescue efforts are “parked” unwillingly.

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