The Blessing of Thomas (…or how to prove that online worship has some resurrection verification)

“Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.” (John 20:29b)

Reunion – Thomas and Christ . Ernst Barlach

Blessed are the ones, says Thomas,
to those who listen to him
this eastertide,
who don’t need a sanctuary to worship God.

Blessed are those who don’t need a choir
to hear holy music,
and who don’t need to sit in a pew
to open their hearts in prayer,
and who don’t need a stained glass window,
or a preacher or even bread and cup
to find the good news.

Blessed are those who really touch
even with gloves on,
who really smile with a mask,
who can be kind on Facetime or Zoom,
who follow a livestream to find Jesus alive.

But also blessed is the Thomas
in every one of us
who acknowledges our longing
to hold someone’s real warm hand
not just the story of a hand
that reaches out to someone else,

and who wants to feel
not Jesus long-ago bleeding side
(we congratulate ourselves about that)
but at least to feel side by side
with other Christians
in order to be side by side with Christ.

Blessed is the Thomas in all of us
who lives with doubts and hopes,

and learns to let go of all expectations
when waiting to meet God.

Ernst Barlach (1870-1938) is one of the most famous sculptors of German Expressionism.  After stays in France, Russia and Italy he returned to Northern Germany. From 1926 Barlach began to accept public commissions for monuments and memorials. The essence of Barlach’s art lies in his ability to express his devotion to and love for his fellow human beings in drawings and sculptures. During the Nazi era the sculptor’s work was considered “degenerate art.” His sculptures were removed or destroyed in 1933. Those that survived were restored in 1945.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to The Blessing of Thomas (…or how to prove that online worship has some resurrection verification)

  1. revkarla says:

    Beautiful. Thank you Maren.

  2. “Our longing to hold someone’s real hand…” Oh, yes.

  3. Pingback: Sermon: Aching for a Touch | Church of the Holy Cross Sermon: Aching for a Touch | God's still speaking from Hilo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.